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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Is Your Traditional Water Heater in Danger of Rupturing?

7/20/2021 (Permalink)

a grey water heater showing signs of erosion SERVPRO of Troup-Coweta Counties is your local water restoration experts. Our team is ready and on-call for any emergency.

As a homeowner, there’s a lot to think about. Aside from just keeping up with all the ins and outs of living life, you may have family to raise or care for and outside activities.

The last thing you want to have to think about is an appliance that should just work. It always works, there’s no reason for it to not work—why would it stop working?

One of the appliances that gets taken for granted most is your home’s water heater. It’s probably not something you see or think about very often.

It may be tucked away in the corner of the basement, or possibly even upstairs in an attic where it’s really out of sight. But out of all your home appliances, there is likely none with as much potential for causing disaster as the water heater.

Why a Water Heater Might Rupture

Traditional water heaters (the kinds with big tanks) have any number of components that could fail over time, and they may not last as long as you would expect. Around 15% of water heaters burst by the sixth year of ownership, and up to 40% burst in less than a decade.

Long-term mineral deposits, heating elements (a whole other danger that could lead to a fiery explosion if a tank bursts) and constant pressure applied to the weakest points in the system all add up to a recipe for eventual failure.

What You Can Do to Prolong the Life of Your Water Heater

Replace the Anode Rod. The Anode Rod is a metal-coated core that keeps the metal interior of your water heater from erosion, and it should be replaced roughly every two years depending on your water’s pH balance and softness.

Flush your water heater twice a year. Run out all the hot water (or just let your teenager take, like, one shower), turn off the power and attach a garden hose to the base of the tank, allowing the tank to flush and relieve the internal pressure.

Regular maintenance. Routine, annual maintenance by a trusted professional is always the best way to catch weaknesses before they become problems. Have your plumber check the tank, the valves and the pipes for signs of wear.

Shut it down. It’s also a good idea to turn off your water heater before you leave for vacation, so you don’t end up with any surprises when you get home. This may not prolong your heater’s life, but you don’t want a burst water heater left unattended for any period of time.

We hope these tips help you maintain and keep your traditional water heater running for a long time to come, but should it ever betray you and make a mess in your basement or attic, call us right away to get the damage minimized and your home restored.

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